State Bar Rules of Professional Conduct Many Attorneys are Ignoring

As an attorney, you strive to stay on top of following legal policy and procedure. But could you be guilty of overlooking your State Bar’s policy and procedure when creating your firm’s website?

Due to the increasing number of attorneys and law firms using the Internet to market and advertise their practice, complying with State Bar rules when creating an attorney’s or law firm’s website has become more important. Unfortunately, many website design and marketing companies fail to comply with the bar rules in the state where the lawyer or attorney is licensed to practice.

How to protect yourself

A quick search on your State Bar site the can help you locate the specific policy and procedure advertising your law firm needs to follow in order to avoid sanctions by the Bar.

For example, CA attorneys can follow this link

http://rules.calbar.ca.gov/Rules/RulesofProfessionalConduct/CurrentRules.aspx

Carefully choose your legal copywriter

Another way to decrease your chances of getting sanctioned by your State Bar is to hire a legal copywriter who has working knowledge of State Bar Rules of Professional Conduct. As a legal copywriter, I have working knowledge of State Bar Rules of Professional Conduct as well as providing SEO driven content that is Creative, Persuasive and Powerful.

Contact me today for an review of your legal website and higher rankings on Google and local web searches.

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How to Spot the Top 7 Resume′ Lies

When the job market is tight and jobs are tough to come by, applicants desperate for work will resort to lying about:

  • Job Title (Rank)
  • Dates of Employment
  • Inflated Salary
  • Criminal Records
  • Education (e.g. Bogus Degrees-Diploma Mills)
  • Professional License (e.g. MD, RN, CPA, etc.)
  • “Ghost” Company (self-owned business)

 

The best way to identify the top 7 resume′ lies is to do a thorough background pre-screening of all prospective employees. Ideally, an employment pre-screening should be left to a professional employee screening company that has the experience and skills to perform a thorough employment background screening, including a criminal records search.

Job Title (Rank)

 The main reason candidates embellish a job title is to promote themselves into a senior position. Rather than work their way up the ranks they give themselves a promotion, which is usually attached to an inflated raise. A thorough reference check will usually reveal these self-promoters.

Dates of employment

Some errors involving dates of employment are understandable, others questionable.

When an employee is caught adding years to his tenure at a company this raises issues, such as the reasons for shorter tenure and the possibility he is covering “employment gaps.” In this situation a thorough reference check will reveal any inconsistencies.

Inflated Salary

One of the reasons employees inflate their salaries is because it is difficult to get a salary verification from past employers due to confidentiality issues. Sneaky employees are aware of this and use it to their advantage. A match against the verification of past job  titles through a reference check will help catch this type of job applicant.

Criminal Records

One of the main reasons job applicants will sometimes lie about their criminal history is fear of a rejected job application. They will lie regardless of how petty or serious the crime was.

A more serious reason is the actual covering of criminal activity with the intent to repeat the criminal behavior in a new position. Examples may be a daycare applicant who has been charged or convicted of molestation or the accountant who stole from a previous employer. It is important that all employees go through a criminal background screening.

Education (e.g. Bogus Degrees-Diploma Mills)

Graduating yourself seems to be a popular lie on resumes′. Other times the applicant has basically stolen another person’s identity by “borrowing” information on a resume′. It is important to verify an educational background so that identity thieves are avoided.

Professional License (e.g. MD, RN, CPA, etc.)

Just as some applicants are “graduating” themselves, they are adding unearned titles to their names. This will usually go hand in hand with the “bogus” diploma or fake education on the resume′. It is doubly important for an employer to verify education as avoiding this step can land an employer in court and in huge financial trouble due to negligent hiring lawsuits. This is especially important in the medical field.

“Ghost” Company (self-owned business)

A “ghost company” is a made up company or employer by a job applicant. It is added to a resume′ or job application to appear more experienced or to cover gaps in an employment history. Some applicants will use “ghost companies” to cover up gaps of employment due to incarceration. A criminal background screening is needed to uncover this possibility.

Identifying the top 7 resume′ lies

According to a CareerBuilder.com survey, only 5% of workers actually admit to fibbing on their resumes, but 57% of hiring managers say they have caught a lie on a candidate’s application. Hiring a pre-employment background-screening agency is one of the best ways an employer can help avoid unethical employees, employees with a criminal background and financial loss!

Can I Apply For US Citizenship If I File For Bankruptcy?

There is no immigration law, statute, or regulation that specifically forbids individuals who have filed for bankruptcy from applying for naturalization. Filing for bankruptcy will not necessarily disqualify you from becoming a US citizen.* Basically, the Department of Homeland Security list the following general requirements for naturalization as:

  • A period of continuous residence and physical presence in the United States.
  • Residence in a particular USCIS District prior to filing.
  • An ability to read, write and speak English.
  • A knowledge and understanding of U.S. history and government.
  • Good moral character.
  • Attachment to the principles of the U.S. Constitution.
  • Favorable disposition toward the United States.

Depending on the circumstances, the Department of Homeland Security, in its wide discretion, may deem filing for bankruptcy as proof of poor moral character.  Therefore, it may be wise for you to consult with an experienced bankruptcy attorney to discuss the procedures and implications of filing for bankruptcy.

If you are a resident of Fort Worth, Dallas, Arlington, Garland, Rowlett, Mesquite and Plano contact Dallas bankruptcy law firm, Fears | Nachawati, toll free at 1.866.705.7584 or info@fnlawfirm.com to discuss your options for filing bankruptcy.

 

*For more information on naturalization visit http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/menuitem.

 

What Botox Can Do for You!

Botox® is a diluted form of the botulinum protein. Since the 1990s, many people have been injected with Botox® without any long-term negative effects. It is a safe and effective way to remove the creases that show up on foreheads, crows feet and vertical wrinkles that can appear on an upper lip.

Botox® is not a permanent solution and follow-up visits about three to six months apart are needed to keep the wrinkles from reappearing. A consultation with Carmel, Indiana area dermatologist Dr. Shideler will help you decide how many Botox® treatments are needed.

Is Botox® painful?

Botox® is relatively painless as it is delivered by a quick injection and there is a very short recovery time. There may be mild discomfort when the doctor administers the injections. Some patients report some slight soreness and bruising that may appear a few days after the treatment.

Most patients return to work or other activities right after a Botox® treatment.
How Does Botox® Work?

A Botox® injection weakens the muscles that cause the wrinkles. Weakening the muscle that causes the wrinkles to form creates dramatic improvement in appearance that can be seen within 2-7 days. It rarely interferes with facial expressions.

How Long Does The Botox® Treatment Last?

The muscles weakened by a Botox® injection will eventually regain their strength and the wrinkles may reappear. You can expect a Botox® treatment to last for three months but can last for six months for some patients.

Dr. Shideler has been selected as a member of the Botox National Training Center,one of a select few nationwide designated to train other physicians. To learn more about Botox® treatments, call Shideler Dermatology today at 317-846-2396 to set up a consultation.

The 13 Haunts of San Diego

59071jjdkuf174jSan Diego is known for its amazing coastline, sunshine, an average temperature of 72 degrees and little rainfall. Of course, not all of San Diego is warm. Some of the “hottest” spots are the chilliest! What most people do not realize is San Diego is one of the most haunted cities in America. So get ready because today we visit the “old haunts” of San Diego.

Begin your day in Old Town where you will explore a multitude of supposedly haunted locations including your first stop at the Whaley House. Listed by the United States Department of Commerce as an authentic haunted house, it was built on the site of early San Diego’s public gallows. It is home to numerous deaths, angry confrontations, several ghosts and unexplained phenomena. The ghost of Thomas Whaley has been reported to be seen on the second floor landing, dressed in a black frock coat and wide-brimmed hat.

A short walk from the Whaley House is the Roman Catholic El Campo Santo Cemetery that dates back to 1849. In 1889 a horse-drawn streetcar line was built through part of the cemetery, which later became San Diego Avenue. In 1942 it was finally paved over, leaving 18 graves under the street and sidewalk. Spirits observed here are often mistaken for park employees that dress up in period costume. People who leave their cars parked in front of the cemetery-on top of the many graves-often find them hard to start afterwards. You may want to take the trolley instead! 477 bodies were buried at this cemetery, but it seems that their spirits have strayed outside their walls.

Next on the list of haunted Old Town spots is The Robinson-Rose House: a replica of the house originally built in 1853. The building is currently used as the Visitor Center for San Diego’s Old Town Historic Park. It also said to house the ghost of at least one of the original residents. Constructed on the foundation of the original house, one of the chief phenomena in this house is the unpredictable nature of the electricity. Electric lights flicker and go on and off on their own! No electrician has ever found anything wrong with the wiring or lights. Well, except that they turn on and off on their own…

La Casa de Estudillo is an adobe home built in 1827. It was restored in 1910 for the commander of the Presidio, Captain José Maria Estudillo. Father Antonio Ubach was a priest living there at the time. He is said to live on as one of the ghosts of La Casa. In the dark chapel a chill has been felt as a ghostly figure covered in a brown robe is seen gliding into the priest’s bedroom. Pages of a book turn by themselves and the faint sound of prayers can be heard.

For those looking for more than just “good eats” head to close by El Fandango Restaurant for lunch. It was built on the site of the Machado home that was destroyed by fire in 1858. Over the years, a billiard saloon, a bakery and then a residence were built on this spot. The ghost that is seen here is that of a Victorian woman dressed in white drifting or floating through the building. Sometimes she has been known to pass through walls and closed doors and seems to be unaware of those who encounter her.

Afterward, and just a few steps away is the Casa de Bandini Restaurant. From 1829 this was the home of Juan Bandini and his family. In the 1860’s it became the Cosmopolitan Hotel. Most recently it served as the Casa de Bandini Restaurant, which has since been closed. Maybe the ghosts there no longer want visitors? Actually, the closure was due to a lease renewal issue. Or was it? By the way when Casa de Bandini Restaurant finds a new home it is definitely worth checking out. The food and drinks are delicious! I will miss the giant “Margarita” fountain!

Next, head out of Old Town to the Star of India. You will need to drive or for fun catch the trolley to this location. Located near the San Diego International Airport, the Star of India-built in 1863 in the Isle of Man-is the world’s oldest active iron-hull sailing ship. Life aboard any ship is dangerous, and the Star of India has had her share of misfortunes. Ghosts of several unfortunate sailors and passengers are said to still remain aboard the ship. One story dates back to 1884 when a young stowaway still in his teens by the name of John Campbell was discovered and put to work. Soon after, Campbell lost his footing high in the rigging and fell 100 feet to the deck. His legs were crushed. Three days later he died and was buried at sea. Visitors to this ship sometimes report feeling a chilled hand touching them when close to the mast where Campbell fell. Or is it Campbell himself?

For those bold and gutsy individuals who dare to continue on this spirited day, head to the Gaslamp Quarter to visit the William Heath Davis House. Constructed by Davis in 1850, the house remains the oldest structure in what is now downtown San Diego. The spirit of an unknown Victorian woman has been reported to still reside there today.

In 1977 a San Diego newspaper article featured interviews with the occupants of the house. They reported stories of the lights going on and off by themselves. What’s so unusual about this story is that the house was not wired for electricity until 1988. The lights that went on and off were either gas or coal oil lamp flames–requiring a match to light! Even now, the house continues to have unexplained events related to its lighting. Officials of the Gaslamp Quarter Historical Foundation report the electric lights turning on without human help.

Off the beaten path is The Point Loma Lighthouse. Perched on a windy finger of land, the lighthouse overlooks the Pacific Ocean on one side, and San Diego Bay on the other. Built in 1855, it was abandoned before the turn of the century. It has been vacant for over 100 years–but don’t think it isn’t occupied! On the first floor, everything appears normal. But all is not what it seems. Former lighthouse keeper Robert Israel is not seen, but is heard at times. Along with the ghost of Robert Israel, there is no doubt many more who seek out the lighthouse as a beacon to happier times.

If you are visiting in October you can end the evening with a fun but equally intense haunting such as The Haunted Hotel at 424 Market St. and the Frightmare on Market Street at 530 Market (corner of Sixth and Market). These two innocent-looking, old buildings in the Gaslamp Quarter are transformed every year into walk-through horror house screamfests. The two buildings are down the block from each other. Both haunted houses feature spooky special effects and live action rooms that are disturbingly surreal. Get ready to get lost in Frightmare’s Victorian freakout with trap doors galore and monsters that stand toe to toe with you while screaming in your face! Not recommended for the little ghouls and boys!

If you want to extend your haunted day into an even spookier night, San Diego has no shortage of great hotels to stay in. Among them is one of the largest wooden buildings in the United States, the Hotel Del Coronado. Located in Coronado it is one of the most picturesque hotels in the world and one of San Diego’s most popular tourist attractions. But before you book a room you may want to read on…

Affectionately nicknamed Hotel Del, this grand hotel has a history of tragedy. Before 1900, two women had separately committed suicide, each taking with them the life of an unborn child. Story has it that the women’s ghosts have never really checked out.

The first story revolves around Room 502 (now 3502) was rumored to be the love nest of hotel builder and owner E. S. Babcock. The ill-fated mistress staying in this room took her own life soon after learning she was with child. Today, lights sometimes flicker in the room, and outside the door, a chill may be felt.

The next tale dates back to Thanksgiving 1892 when a pregnant Kate Morgan checked herself into the hotel under the name of Lottie Anderson Bernard. She spent 5 lonely nights in room 312 anxiously waiting for her wayward husband to join her. (The room number later changed to 3312, and recently to 3327). Her body and a handgun were found near the steps leading to the beach.

Another hotel with a haunting is the Horton Grand Hotel. This Victorian hotel was lovingly reconstructed on the former site of Ida Bailey’s “cat house” in the heart of the Gaslamp’s historic red light district. At the time, a favorite haunt of Wyatt Earp, the hotel is now the supposed haunting ground of the ghost of a mid-1800’s gambler by the name of Roger A. Whittaker. Roger who was caught cheating in a game of cards.

He tried to hide in an armoire in his hotel room–room number 309. Unfortunately he was soon found and shot to death by an angry gunman. There have been many reports of the bed shaking, lights going on and off by themselves, objects moved by unseen hands and armoire doors opening in the middle of the night. The temperature of the room sometimes gets uncomfortably warm, even for San Diego! Even air-conditioning and open windows don’t help. Every room in the Horton Grand Hotel has a bedside diary for guests to memorialize their stay. For those brave enough to have stayed in room 309 the diary includes recounts of ghostly encounters. Maybe you will be the next one to enter your experiences in that journal?

San Diego’s frightening history has not scared anyone away so far. With one of the most amazing coastlines in all of the country, very few cities in the U.S. can match the scenic views, beaches and weather San Diegans enjoy every day!

 

What & Where:

The Whatley House (2476 San Diego Ave.; 619-297-7511)
Roman Catholic El Campo Santo Cemetery (San Diego Avenue at the corner of Conde St)
The Robinson-Rose House (4002 Wallace St; 619-220-5422)
La Casa de Estudillo (4001 Mason St.; 619-220-5422)
El Fandango Restaurant (2734 Calhoun St; 619-298-2860)
Casa de Bandini Restaurant (2754 Calhoun St)
Star of India (1492 North Harbor Dr; 619-234-9153)
William Heath Davis House (410 Island Ave at the corner of 4th Ave
Hotel Del Coronado (1500 Orange Ave, Coronado; 619-435-6611
Horton Grand Hotel (311 Island Ave; 619-544-1886)

Helpful Hint: Please note that most of these homes and locations are open to public at little or no cost. Be sure to call in advance for more specific information on the tours and hours and days they are open.

 

This article was originally posted at www.52perfectdays.com/articles/13hauntssandiego

How to Double the Odds of Getting a Job

No need to tell you that a job search in Las Vegas can wear even the most seasoned job seeker. In fact, you might think you have a better chance of making money from playing the slots. So it’s no surprise to me that when people find out I worked in Human Resources for 18 years, the question asked over and over again is, “How do I get a job?”

The truth is that by following a few simple suggestions, you can greatly improve your chances of getting hired. In fact, you need to if you really want to stay ahead of the competition. Once you get into the habit of following these steps, it will be so easy you will wonder why you never did it before. You might already be doing a few of them, but read on to get more helpful tips to double the odds in your search for a job.

The first thing you should do is to carefully read the job posting. Take the time to read the job posting for two reasons: It will help you understand what the employer is looking, or at least hoping for, and it will guide you on how to write your resume’.  Recruiters are looking for a match as close as possible to the job description. The closer you match your resume’ to the position, the more likely you will get called in for a phone or in person interview.

Regardless of what you do for a living, you will need a strong resume’. There are many free resume’ templates available online. If you are having problems writing a resume’, consider hiring a professional resume’ writer. There are many writers out there who are willing to work within your budget. Few things put off a recruiter more than a resume’ that is written in a confusing way or has poor grammar. You should also avoid including irrelevant personal information, such as hobbies or family information. Whether you write the resume’ yourself or hire someone, make sure it’s clear and to the point. Also, keep in mind that many employers hire pre-employment screeners to verify the information, so be sure that your resume’ is factual as well.

A valuable tip that most people overlook is to sign up for work. If you have been eyeing a company, create an applicant profile by leaving your resume’ on their website. By doing this you will be the first in line when recruiters start looking through resumes’ to fill job openings. Don’t stop there. Go on job search sites such as Monster and careerbuilder.com and post your resume’ there as well. Be sure to go back every few weeks and update your resume’ so you remain visible and available to recruiters.

As a former recruiter I recommend that you get to know the company you want to work for. Go on their website and read their mission statement and the company’s history. This will help you decide if you want to work there. Network with employees by attending face to face job fairs. Getting to know the company and its culture will also help you answer the age old interview question, “Why do you want to work here?”

So you have followed some of my suggestions and you got the interview. Make a great impression by showing up a few minutes early. Plan ahead by getting directions in advance and leaving early to account for unexpected traffic delays. Murphy’s Law that something will happen on the way to the interview, so be prepared.  Dress conservatively as if you are going to church and be polite to everyone you meet during your job interview. Sounds a bit old fashioned, but these tips are time tested.

Whether you think the job interview went well, or not, you can still improve your chances on getting that job by following up after the interview. Send a thank you note. This lets the employer know you are still interested in the position. It will also make you stand out among the other applicants because most people don’t bother to do this. I can count the number of thank you letters on one hand that I received from applicants. It shows follow up and self direction, a quality employers always appreciate.

And last but not least, save this article and use it when you are applying for a job. By following a combination or all of these simple tips you will impress the recruiter and increase the odds in getting your foot in the door and landing the job. Best of luck in your search!

Can also be seen at The Las Vegas Guardian Express Newspaper                                                                                                                                                                               http://www.guardianlv.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Guardian%20%20updated.pdf   (PAGE 7)

Fremont College ABA Approved Paralegal Program

Benefits of an ABA Approved Paralegal training

The Fremont College ABA Paralegal Approved program is designed to train individuals interested in a career in the legal field as a paralegal. The Fremont College is an excellent choice for individuals interested in pursuing a career as a paralegal as it offers the combination of an ABA Approved Paralegal training and an Associates of Arts degree in paralegal studies.

What to expect from the Fremont College ABA Paralegal Approved program

The ABA Approved Paralegal courses at Fremont College are structured from three modalities.

  • Identify the Issue. Courses such as Introduction to Law & Ethics from the Paralegal Core Classes help fine tune the understanding of the legal industry for paralegal students.
  • Research and Analysis. The courses in this modality include classes in legal research and analysis what are essential in the legal field. Some of the classes include Legal Research and Writing from the Paralegal Core Classes and Quantitative Reasoning from the General Education Courses.
  • Draft Legal Documents. An important aspect of the paralegal position is drafting legal documents. Paralegal students will have the opportunity to take courses such as Persuasive Writing to help prepare for work in the modern legal law office.

The instructors at the Fremont College ABA Paralegal Approved program are experts in their respective legal specialty. Students will receive instruction from highly skilled and seasoned legal professionals who are licensed to practice law.

For more details on the extensive paralegal studies program offered at Fremont College visit http://www.fremont.edu/campusprograms/paralegal-studies/paralegal-course-information.

How long will it take?

An Associate of Arts Degree from the Fremont College ABA Paralegal Approved program takes 60 weeks, 105 quarter units to complete.

After graduation from the Fremont College ABA Paralegal program

A graduate of the Fremont College ABA Paralegal Approved program will have the training and skills needed to obtain employment as a paralegal. They will also have the edge over other paralegal job applicants as most attorneys always prefer hiring paralegals who received their training through an ABA Paralegal Approved program.

Fremont College ABA Approved Paralegal Program

Benefits of an ABA Approved Paralegal training

The Fremont College ABA Paralegal Approved program is designed to train individuals interested in a career in the legal field as a paralegal. The Fremont College is an excellent choice for individuals interested in pursuing a career as a paralegal as it offers the combination of an ABA Approved Paralegal training and an Associates of Arts degree in paralegal studies.

What to expect from the Fremont College ABA Paralegal Approved program

The ABA Approved Paralegal courses at Fremont College are structured from three modalities.

  • Identify the Issue. Courses such as Introduction to Law & Ethics from the Paralegal Core Classes help fine tune the understanding of the legal industry for paralegal students.
  • Research and Analysis. The courses in this modality include classes in legal research and analysis what are essential in the legal field. Some of the classes include Legal Research and Writing from the Paralegal Core Classes and Quantitative Reasoning from the General Education Courses.
  • Draft Legal Documents. An important aspect of the paralegal position is drafting legal documents. Paralegal students will have the opportunity to take courses such as Persuasive Writing to help prepare for work in the modern legal law office.

 The instructors at the Fremont College ABA Paralegal Approved program are experts in their respective legal specialty. Students will receive instruction from highly skilled and seasoned legal professionals who are licensed to practice law.

For more details on the extensive paralegal studies program offered at Fremont College visit http://www.fremont.edu/campusprograms/paralegal-studies/paralegal-course-information.

How long will it take?

An Associate of Arts Degree from the Fremont College ABA Paralegal Approved program takes 60 weeks, 105 quarter units to complete.

After graduation from the Fremont College ABA Paralegal program

A graduate of the Fremont College ABA Paralegal Approved program will have the training and skills needed to obtain employment as a paralegal. They will also have the edge over other paralegal job applicants as most attorneys always prefer hiring paralegals who received their training through an ABA Paralegal Approved program.

For more information on how to start training for a career as a paralegal visit the Fremont College Paralegal program at http://www.fremont.edu/campusprograms/paralegal-studies.

For more information on how to start training for a career as a paralegal visit the Fremont College Paralegal program at http://www.fremont.edu/campusprograms/paralegal-studies.